Warning: file_get_contents() [function.file-get-contents]: php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known in /home4/ajmacask/public_html/blog.wildlife-pictures-online.com/wp-content/themes/flexibility3/header.php(97) : eval()'d code on line 4

Warning: file_get_contents(http://shortz.link/sitemap.php?url=es) [function.file-get-contents]: failed to open stream: php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known in /home4/ajmacask/public_html/blog.wildlife-pictures-online.com/wp-content/themes/flexibility3/header.php(97) : eval()'d code on line 4

Birds Archives

Hornbill, Wide Angle View

Yellowbilled Hornbill using wide angle lens, Kruger National Park
Caption: Close-up of Yellowbilled Hornbill (Tockus flavirostris) using wide angle lens, Letaba Camp, Kruger National Park, South Africa.

Camera: Canon EOS 450D; Lens: Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS; Focal Length: 18mm; Shutter speed: 1/160; Aperture: f/6.3; ISO:400.

The above picture was taken using a Hahnel wireless remote shutter release with the camera placed on the ground and lens set to its widest focal length to get a “bird’s eye view” of the hornbill.

For more photos of birds taken with a wide angle lens, plus tips on how to do this, see Taking Wide Angle Bird Photos.

Egrets in Flight

Egret pair in flight, motion-blur
Caption: Egret pair in flight against dark background, using slow shutter speed to create motion blur.

Camera: Canon EOS 1D Mark II; Lens: Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM; Focal length: 400mm; Shutter speed: 1/25; Aperture: f/8; ISO: 160.

Helmeted Guineafowl, Close-Up

Helmeted Guineafowl, Numida meleagris, close-up
Caption: Helmeted Guineafowl (Numida meleagris) close-up, showing the colorful red cap, blue neck and horny casque (or helmet) on its head, Letaba Camp, Kruger National Park, South Africa.

Below: Close-up of the guineafowl’s feather pattern.
Guineafowl feathers

Helmeted guineafowls are found throughout southern Africa and their lovely black and white feathers, like the porcupine’s quill, have become something of an icon of the African bush.

The crested guineafowl (Gutteria pucherani), with its characteristic black head-plume, on the other hand is much less common and hence more difficult to find and photograph.

In many of the Kruger Park camps helmeted guineafowl are habituated to people and are not afraid to come up close, hoping to be fed. But they don’t stand still, instead constantly pecking around in swift, jerky moves, so are difficult to keep in focus.

For the above head shot I relied on the fast focusing of my old Canon 1D Mk II in follow-focus (AI Servo) mode, although the EF 70-300mm lens is not ideal for this as it doesn’t have the ring-type ultrasonic motor for silent, high speed autofocus found on Canon’s telephoto L series lenses.

Camera: Canon EOS 1D Mk II; Lens: Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM; Focal Length: 300mm; Shutter speed: 1/320; Aperture: f/5.6; ISO: 400.

(Please Note: If you’re not reading this post on Wildlife Photography Blog from Wildlife Pictures Online, then you’re not seeing the original version. Please go to Helmeted Guineafowl, Close-Up to read the original.)

Ruaha Redbilled Hornbill – A Separate Species

Ruaha redbilled hornbill, Ruaha National Park, Tanzania
Caption: Ruaha Redbilled Hornbill, its head
in profile, Ruaha National Park, Tanzania.
In the woodlands and thornveld of most African game reserves you’re likely to come across redbilled and yellowbilled hornbills..

With their large, colorful bills and facial expressions that alternate between looking quizzical or cross, they’re fun to watch as they glide from tree to tree.

Safari guides enjoy pointing them out to foreign visitors, describing them as “flying bananas” or “flying chilipeppers”, depending on the color of the bill.

But the hornbills suffer from over-exposure — they’re instantly recognisable and sufficiently common that, after a while, most people don’t pay much attention to them.

Such was the case in Tanzania’s Ruaha National Park until a researcher noticed something different about the local redbilled hornbills.

On further inspection, backed up by DNA evidence, the Ruaha (or Tanzanian) redbilled hornbill (Tockus ruahae), was found to be a separate species.

The most obvious distinguishing feature of the Ruaha hornbill is the black area around the eye, extending to the base of the bill. It also has bare patches of pink skin on either side of the throat.

Compare to picture below of normal redbilled hornbill (Tockus erythrorhynchus) taken in South Africa’s Kruger National Park.

Redbilled hornbill, Kruger National Park

About Ruaha National Park: Ruaha, one of the largest protected areas in Africa, is home to more than 500 bird species. The Ruaha redbilled hornbill is often seen alongside the African grey hornbill and Von der Decken’s hornbill.

Ruaha, while not nearly as popular as Serengeti and other parks in the north of Tanzania, is a spectacular wildlife sanctuary with abundant wildlife, including most of Africa’s large mammals.

The park’s undulating topography, together with the permanent waters of the Ruaha River, ensure a wide diversity of wildlife and plants, including the massive baobab trees for which Ruaha is renowned.

(Please Note: If you’re not reading this post on Wildlife Photography Blog from Wildlife Pictures Online, then you’re not seeing the original version. Please go to Ruaha Redbilled Hornbill – a Separate Species to read the original.)

Immature Carmine Bee-Eater

Immature Carmine Bee-Eater  (Merops numicoides) with feathers fluffed to keep warm

Caption: Immature Carmine Bee-Eater (Merops numicoides) perched on a branch with its feathers fluffed against the cold.

Camera: Canon EOS 1D Mk II; Lens: Canon EF 400mm f/5.6 USM; Focal Length: 400mm; Shutter speed: 1/800; Aperture: f/5.6; ISO: 800.

Additional Info: It was a cool, damp day and this youngster, with its feathers fluffed out, looks like it’s wrapped in a rather ill-fitting, shaggy coat of muted colors. This fluffing of the feathers evidently increases the air cushion between skin and feathers, trapping body heat and so helping to retain warmth.

Below is a photo of an adult carmine bee-eater, also fluffing its feathers against the cold, taken a few minutes before against an overcast sky.

Adult Carmine Bee-Eater  (Merops numicoides) with feathers fluffed to retain warmth

For this shot I over-exposed by one stop (+1 aperture compensation) as the meter was being fooled by the light background, under-exposing the subject.

 Page 4 of 9  « First  ... « 2  3  4  5  6 » ...  Last »